Skip to main content

Five Resume Tips for College Students

Five Resume Tips for College Students

Five Resume Tips for College Students

You’re still in college, and the world of work can wait a few years. So who needs a resume?

You do. Armed with a well-constructed resume, you will be prepared for potential opportunities throughout your time in college. These include seasonal, part-time and temporary work, as well as assistantships, internships and fellowships. Another plus: You’ll be ready to update your resume when you’re looking for that first job after graduation.

So where do you start? Here are five tips for writing your first resume.

1. Start with a Qualifications Summary

Sue Campbell, a professional resume writer and president of 1st-Writer.com, says that a summary of your top qualifications is often more effective than an objective statement. This is particularly true if your career goal is undefined.

"I don't recommend writing a vague objective, because it will typically focus on what the job seeker wants, which is usually of no consequence to the person making the hiring decision,” says Robyn Feldberg, a certified career management coach and owner of Abundant Success Career Services. “Instead of an objective, I recommend that students format a profile section that clearly gives the reader a picture of the value they offer a potential employer.” Keep your summary brief -- a few hard-hitting sentences are perfect.

2. Give Education Top Billing

Typically, education is at the bottom of a resume, but students are often better served by moving their education toward the top.

"Without experience in the target field, education is often the most valuable information a student has to offer," explains Campbell. "The education section can move down in priority as the job seeker gains experience.”

According to Feldberg, "when formatting education, include the name of the college or university, its city and state, anticipated graduation date, extracurricular activities and courses related to your job target.” If your GPA is 3.0 or higher, you can include that too.

3. Describe Unrelated Jobs the Right Way

Many students have part-time, seasonal or temporary work experience that is unrelated to future career goals. You don't want to pack your document with irrelevant details, says Feldberg. On the other hand, prospective employers value candidates who demonstrate dependability and a strong work ethic, even if the experience is in a different industry.

Pull out the most important aspects of your work experience, advises Lorie Lebert, CEO of career management firm Resumes for Results and contributor to numerous resume books, including Best Resumes for College Students and New Grads. "Go into detail about projects you were involved in that show leadership, drive and determination," she says. Campbell suggests students extract the skills and achievements that are most relevant to employers' needs and leave out details that don't add value.

4. Think Like an Employer -- and Like a Job Seeker

If you're applying to jobs or internships, "look at your experience through two pairs of eyes: the potential employer's and your own," says Campbell.

Study job ads or internship announcements that interest you. "For example, if an ad states that communication skills are important, think about times when your communication skills came into play," Campbell says. "If you worked in any customer service-related position, you definitely used communication skills." You can emphasize these skills on your resume.

"Next, look at your experience through your own eyes," says Campbell. "What work did you enjoy? While these skills and experiences may not be directly relevant to the positions you're targeting, they're good indicators of areas where you're likely to excel in the future."

5. Pick the Right Resume Length and Format

"For most college students, a one-page resume is plenty," says Feldberg. But she adds that this isn't a hard-and-fast rule, particularly for students who have established a track record through internships or work experience. For these students, "a one-page resume would sell them short," she says, and it's OK to go to two pages.

Impress employers with a high-impact resume and cover letter from the experts at Monster's Resume Writing Service.

Education programs to fit your profession